Search for the new president underway

Isherwood_portrait 045_300dp_edit

Isherwood_portrait 045_300dp_editBy Meagan Hurley, Editor-In-Chief

As President Dr. J. Thomas Isherwood prepares to retire after thirteen years of presidency, the search begins for a new president at Reinhardt University.

According to Dr. Isherwood, this will be a national search.

“[AGB] has contacts with people all across the United States. This will be a national search and there will be applicants from all over the U.S. There’s a search committee of about nineteen people—three faculty, three staff, one student, six or seven board members and three or four from the community,” he said.

In correlation with the outside search party AGB, (Association of Governing Boards), presidential search consultant Dr. Jim Davis met with both students and faculty members, trustees and alumni, to discern what qualities the Reinhardt community are looking for in a new president and what subjects are of concern. An open forum was also conducted for anyone wishing to share comments.

“You can make a difference in who gets chosen for the next president of Reinhardt University,” Davis said.

Students, in a designated meeting with Dr. Davis, expressed desire for an involved leader who puts emphasis on availability, on campus presence, and transparency. Students said that the new president should contribute to the “family” feel of Reinhardt.

“People come to Reinhardt instead of UGA and all these other places because they want a family. I think that our whole campus could have that if the president would open his house to people and come to events,” said Resident Advisor Isabella Novaes.

Students also expressed concern over budgeting for student organizations and suggested that a new president may fundraise more actively. Davis found potential issue in this request, as a fundraising president is more likely to be out and thus may be unable to contribute a present figure on campus.

When students had addressed the bulk of their concerns, Davis had a few questions for them to answer. He put it to the students to notify him if they believed that Reinhardt would be accepting of a multiracial president, a female president, or a homosexual president. Opinions varied among student leaders.

“If we had a woman, she’d probably be off to a rocky start, but I think she’d do fine. She’d be accepted by the students without issue,” said SGA President Alexander Bryant.

“Everyone loves JoEllen Wilson and many of our faculty members are female,” added SGA Parliamentarian Steven Vosika.

Davis stated that thirty percent or more of applicants will likely be female.

He later asked if race is considered an issue or a non-issue on campus. Resident Advisor and Reinhardt Captain Valencia Washington commented, “I feel that it’s okay. You’ll find—and a lot of people do—that people still get stereotyped, and that’s everywhere. People do get judged based on their looks rather than their personality and I do feel that we could do a bit better showing more diversity.”

Davis asked, “Do you think a non-white person is ready to be president of this college in this particular time and atmosphere?”

Washington said, “Once again, yes and no. Kind of with the woman thing, I feel that a lot of people would be on board for it and a lot of people would be very hesitant.”

Davis then posed what he called an even tougher question; “Would this campus consider a gay person in a leadership role?”

Bryant responded, “Probably not.”

Washington added, “No.”

Vosika elaborated, “It’s a lot more open on the student side. It’s becoming more accepted on campus, but again it’s a community thing too. Reinhardt might accept them, but Waleska might not.”

According to Davis, this is an important piece of information to know because, of the fifteen presidential searches he has completed in the last six years, many of the presidents chosen have been women, people of multiracial ethnicities, and of homosexual orientation.

Presidential search committee members are looking to complete the search in early February of 2015, with recruiting, screening, and interviewing taking place prior to such date, said Executive Secretary to the Presidential Search Committee Kelly Morris. According to her, the next step in the search process is to create a profile for the position and to place an advertisement in hiring publications.

According to Isherwood, the current plan is for the chosen president to start on July 1, 2015.

He said, ”They hope to announce the new president in February because we have two vice presidents who are leaving the university. The hope is that we’d have the finalists for those positions so the new president can talk to the finalists and the finalists could see who they would work for. They could be in communication.”

Davis encourages input from the Reinhardt community and wishes to hear any comments or concerns from parties who were unable to attend the open forum. Anyone wishing to speak to him may contact him directly at jdavis@agbsearch.com.

More information on the search for the new president will be made available as progression continues.

 

 

 

 

 

City of Waleska plans to attempt hotel/motel tax ordinance on resident students

By Meagan Hurley and Kelcey Caulder

Members of the City of Waleska met with President Dr. Thomas Isherwood last Friday to discuss the city’s planned imposition of a hotel/motel tax ordinance, a consumer lodging taxation, on Reinhardt resident students. If passed, the ordinance would require approximately 615 resident students to pay a set taxation fee, ranging from three to eight percent, each semester in order to reside at the Waleska campus.

If passed, the ordinance would be the first instance of hotel/motel taxation to occur on a residential campus in Georgia. It would go into effect on July 1, 2015.

According to city officials, the proceeds of this taxation would go toward placing and maintaining streetlights, sidewalks and new signage around Waleska, as a portion of the hotel/motel tax must directly benefit community tourism.

In breaking down how the taxation would work, Aimee Abernathy, City Manager, said, “You pay a set number for food, room, board, and all of it. It’s part of that package. So what you would do, [they] would take out anything for food, the only thing that would be looked at is the count for heads in beds. The actual amount of bodies that sleep in just the facility. You would divide that amount into the number of days of the semester, multiply that times thirty, and then that’s by the percentages.

So, if part of the package is $500 dollars for thirty days, it would be $15 a semester for this tax. That tax would go into sidewalks, streetlights, and other improvements.”

In short, the rate will be concluded by dividing the number of residents by the number of days in a semester, and then multiplying that number times thirty.

Doris Jones, Mayor of Waleska, views the taxation as a way for students to be involved in the improvement of the Waleska community.

“We want to change the face of Waleska…By doing the small amount that you would be doing, in some ways you would gain ownership, you would have a piece of Waleska… You could walk around and say, ‘I helped do that,’” Mayor Jones said last Friday.

She continued, ”We are looking to bring about a better looking Waleska. Reinhardt is already beautiful. We have not had the funds to do it with… This is a way that it’s not going to hurt the students.”

Abernathy added, “[Dr. Isherwood] explained to us the concerns of the students and of the independent schools because this has not been imposed in Georgia. It is legal, but people have not taken advantage of this opportunity. We are so small that we need this opportunity. “

University President Isherwood takes a different stance on the hotel/motel ordinance, stating that he feels Reinhardt students are, and should be considered, citizens of Waleska. Citizens of a jurisdiction are not subject to hotel/motel ordinances.

“I expressed to the mayor that I felt the students living in residence halls were citizens of Waleska and that our students should be able to register to vote in the city of Waleska,” he said.

”I spoke to the mayor and city manager Friday. My understanding is that they are being advised by the Department of Community Affairs that they can apply a hotel/ motel tax to our residential students. We have been in contact with our attorney and he interprets the law differently and doesn’t feel that that’s possible.

Basically, I informed the mayor that this will be an issue for our students and their parents. We will encourage our students to express themselves and to be involved, to be respectful, but at the same time to be free to take whatever political action they feel appropriate…If it does become law, obviously Reinhardt obeys the law.”

Student Government Association President, Alexander Bryant, issued the following statement on behalf of himself and the SGA Executive Board:

“Student Government Association does not support or condone the taxation policy proposed by the City of Waleska. Reinhardt University and its residential students do not want or need this financial burden imposed by the City. We believe it sets a dangerous precedent for taxation of residential students not only in the community of North Georgia, but nationwide.

We are not opposed to the City of Waleska’s growth, in fact, we support it. However, we believe that there is a way to achieve that growth which is mutually beneficial to both parties, and does not involve putting a further financial strain on low-income college students. Student Government Association will work to mobilize the students of Reinhardt to fight this policy in any way possible.”

The proposed hotel/motel taxation will be discussed in further depth at the City Council meeting on Sept. 22. Meetings occur every first and third Monday of the month at 7 p.m. Council members encourage attendance.

For more details regarding the hotel/motel taxation ordinance, visit:

http://www.dca.state.ga.us/development/research/programs/hotelmoteltax.asp

City of Waleska attempts hotel/motel tax ordinance

According to Alexander Bryant, Reinhardt SGA President, Mayor of Waleska Doris Jones will meet with University President Dr. Thomas Isherwood tomorrow, Sept. 12 to discuss details of the city’s planned imposition of a hotel/motel taxation ordinance on the city of Waleska and Reinhardt students. Resident students would be affected by this taxation, if the ordinance is passed.

More details to come as information is given.

To learn more about the hotel/motel tax ordinance, visit: http://www.dca.state.ga.us/development/research/programs/ordinance.asp

 

Meagan Hurley and Kelcey Caulder 

Connection Lost: What’s Up with Wifi?

Courtesy of Google

Courtesy of Google

What’s up with the Reinhardt Wifi?

Every night after 9 the wireless internet connections at Reinhardt slow, streaming Netflix becomes nearly impossible, and students doing homework scream in frustration at the sluggish connection.

Virgina Tomlinson, head of the IT department at Reinhardt, attributes this to the amount of devices connected to the networks. The IT department has not seen any evidence that the access point connections have not completely gone down, but rather have simply slowed due to the amount of people trying to access the internet at the same time.

When the access points were installed in 2008, students had two or three devices that connect to the internet. Now, students have many more devices: laptops, phones, iPods, iPads, Kindles and more. Because all these devices are connected to the same access point, it will slow connections to an unbearable speed.

If a student is having issues, Tomlinson recommends turning off the wifi on devices not in use. The IT department hopes to straighten out this problem in the near future. President Isherwood wants to raise $800,000 to enhance the technology at Reinhardt. If the money is raised, the IT department plans to rip out all the old access points and replace them with new ones. For the time being, be patient.

Candice Bailey

SGA Student Senate 2012-2013

hiltonianbanner

…And the votes are in! RU’s Student Senate offices for the 2012-2013 school year have now been announced. Positions are as follows:

Freshman Class Representative: Breanna Hall

Sophomore Class Representative: Hannah Buckner

Junior Class Representative: Kody Spaniak

Senior Class Representative: Stephen Karafa

Male Residence Halls Representatives: Joshua Robinson & Joshua Vavases

Female Residence Hall Representatives: Abby Hermes and Raven Stegall

Commuter Representatives: Ashe Thomson, Katie Gibson, and Matthew Freeman

Student Body at Large Representatives: Alexander Levy, Matthew Higgins, Justin Lundstrom, Jessica Mackinnon, and Jamarcus Roberts

Congrats to all new representatives!

Meagan Hurley, Managing Editor

SGA Executive Board for 2012-2013

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The Student Government Association has officially announced that, as of today, the 2012-2013 Executive Board has been chosen.

Students voted both Monday and Tuesday on who they would like to represent the different leadership positions for SGA.

Your new Executive Board is as follows:

President: Virginia Lynn Hutton
Vice President of Administration: Daniel Guerrero
Vice President of Student Activities: Katie Reynolds
Treasurer: Maria Flores
Secretary: Jennifer Stogner.
Chief of Staff: Justin Buddenhagen

Congratulations to all the members of the new Executive Board.

Meagan Hurley

Letia Wyatt becomes new Coordinator of Student Activities

Letia

On February 8, 2012, Reinhardt welcomed Letia Wyatt to campus as the new Coordinator of Student Activities.

Ms. Wyatt is a native of Hope, Arkansas, and attended college in Conway, Arkansas. She received her bachelors degree in Print Journalism and her masters degree in College Student Personnel Services and Administration, both from the University of Central Arkansas. While at UCA, she was an active member of her sorority Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., and was also a yearbook staff writer, mentor, and volunteer in the Student Life Office.

Ms. Wyatt says she chose to come to Reinhardt because it’s a unique change from her alma mater and because she loves to help students. When asked about her goals as the new coordinator of SAC, she commented,” As Coordinator I plan to add structure and balance to SAC and, most importantly, have fun. SAC is an extremely good group of students to work with and I look forward to working with them and the student body while spreading school spirit across RU’s campus! GO EAGLES!”

Meagan Hurley

Plans to Transform Reinhardt College to Reinhardt University

reinhardt university

From academy to junior college to college, Reinhardt has undergone many titles and with them many changes. Now, Reinhardt is preparing for its biggest name change yet; Reinhardt University.

Dr. Roger Lee, Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students, reports during an interview on the topic,” The feedback we have been getting is overwhelmingly supportive.”

Apparently, the new name will look great on student resumes, diplomas, and will harbor more competition for the school. Some Reinhardt students share this positive opinion. “I think that’s a great idea. I actually applaud [the administration] for [proposing the change],” said Freshman King Arron Burns. Freshmen Stephen Daffer also agrees with, “If it looks better on resumes and diplomas why not? If it gets you better jobs and gets your life on track.”

However, not all students view Reinhardt University as an improvement . “I think the change from Reinhardt College to Reinhardt University is a bad idea. It lowers standards. When you think university you think of something big and that’s not what we are,” said a passionate junior.

Many students are concerned with how they will be affected by the transition. Addressing non-financial concerns, Dr. Lee assures that class sizes will be kept traditionally small through more selective admission and undergraduate programs should not be overshadowed by graduate programs, as this is a rare occurrence. He confirms that there will likely be a steady rise in tuition as usual, but not relating to Reinhardt’s change of name.

Funds will be raised in other ways to accommodate the title change such as the closing of Paul-Jones Hall to conserve costs. Aside from the name itself, Reinhardt University will happen over a period of time. New campus and roadway signs, school letterheads, athletic uniforms, web pages, maps, and so on will be budgeted into the school’s spending incrementally.
The plan for transforming Reinhardt College into Reinhardt University will be proposed to the Board of Trustees, scheduled this coming January. Until then, Dr. Lee would like to have Reinhardt family and supports keep in mind that “it isn’t about the building, it’s about the people.”

Thai Cromer

SGA Leadership Changes

SGA

Catherine Cox resigned Wednesday from her post as president of the Reinhardt Student Government Association. Vice president for Administration Christopher Williams will step into the vacancy, being sworn in during the Student Senate meeting on Tuesday, November 3rd. Williams will serve the remainder of Cox’s term through May 1, 2010.

Cox, who has served as president since May 2009, resigned October 28 citing personal reasons. “I enjoyed my role as SGA president, but after a great deal of reflection and thought, I have decided to leave the position for personal reasons. I made my decision to leave the presidency now to allow Chris time to design and implement his own agenda for the year. I cannot think of anyone more passionate about this college. He is more than qualified for this position and has accepted this responsibility with an eager heart to serve students and Reinhardt College. I look forward to seeing the great things that he and his team will accomplish. I want to say thank you one last time for giving me the opportunity to serve you as Student Body President,” said Cox.

Williams, Cox’s opponent in last spring’s presidential election, brings SGA officer board experience to the role. Prior to being selected as Vice President for Administration, Williams served two years in the Student Senate.

Despite the rebuilding period that SGA now faces, Williams remains enthusiastic. “With Catherine’s resignation and my acceptance of the presidency, I want reassure the campus community that the idea of serving students will not fall through the gap, and I hope that the campus community will rally behind the SGA as we continue to move forward and seek avenues to enrich the Reinhardt experience. Catherine put together a great Executive Board and a strong Student Senate is in place. The SGA has already started working on the goals that were set in place by Catherine at the beginning of summer. I truly want to thank Catherine for her dedication to Reinhardt and for a good start to the year,” Williams said.

Williams will nominate a new Vice President for Administration, in consultation with the SGA Executive Board and the SGA Advisor(s). To take office, the nominee must be approved by two-thirds of the Senate members present and voting.
Those looking to fill the position of Vice President for Administration must be an upperclassman, have at least a 3.0 grade-point average, have served as a representative, senator, or in other capacity in SGA or its associated councils for one full academic year
be in and remain in financial, disciplinary, and be in academic “Good Standing” with the College. Those seeking to be considered for Vice President for Administration must submit a letter of intent to the SGA Executive Board by Friday, November 13, 2009.

Erin Turner

We Have a Museum?!

fun heritage

Students of Reinhardt College, I give you the Funk Heritage Center (FHC). The FHC is dedicated to educating people about Southeastern Indians and Appalachian settlers. It is part of a complex of museums and sites that deal with Georgia’s Native Americas called the “Chieftains Trail,” and was designated the Georgia’s Official Frontier and Southeastern Indian Interpretive Center by the state legislature. There are many museums on college campuses including Berry College, Emory, and Georgia Tech. But the Reinhardt museum is very unusual.

The FHC contains a unique collection of tools from more than 100 crafts like blacksmiths, coopers, wheelwrights, and veterinarians. The antique tools were collected by one man, Joseph Alan Sellars of Marietta, GA. After his death, the Smithsonian almost acquired this collection; however, his family wanted it to remain in the area. I know, tools sound boring, but the Sellars Gallery of Historic Hand Tools is nothing short of impressive. I’m not the type of person to get excited about tools, but my reaction was simply “wow.” It’s that amazing.

The museum also contains a large collection of Native American artifacts from many different eras of history in the Hall of the Ancients. Here you will find a series of dioramas depicting life for the Native Americans in different periods of time for over 12,000 years, anchored by a massive petroglyph, or carved stone. The Rogers Gallery of Contemporary Indian Art and the Buffington Gallery contain an extensive collection of paintings, baskets, sculpture and pottery.

Did I mention it’s free with your Reinhardt ID?

Alright, so maybe you’re not a history buff. Maybe you think that it’s just a boring old museum, even if it is free. Despite that, the FHC is a valuable, and much underused, part of campus. Obviously it would be an excellent place for American history and Georgia history students to go for class (field trip, anyone?), but through the Center’s programs there are far more opportunities. As Dr. Joseph Kitchens, the museum’s director, pointed out, a museum is really all about its programs. Anybody can have a collection of cool old things, but a museum’s programs provide opportunities for hands-on education and experience that would be difficult to find elsewhere.

Biology and Education majors should check out the Nature Club, which is comprised of students from R.M. Moore elementary. It meets on Wednesday afternoon, and students go on hikes, do crafts, study insects, animals, and plant gardens, like a beautiful butterfly garden. They always need volunteers. There’s also a summer camp, which this year is June 16 – 19. Both are great ways to gain experience in teaching or history.

Also, the FHC is place where students can acquire experience and information, especially in history, but also in education and other fields. Martha Hout, the Public Relations and Programs Coordinator, recently gave a class lecture on nonprofit public relations for a group of marketing students. It is opportunities like this that make the FHC a valuable part of the Reinhardt community.
Some of the other programs offered include the Georgia History Timeline, a three-day October event that draws approximately 3,000 students from all over the area. This is a living history program where professional re-enactors come and demonstrate life in Georgia from pre-contact Indians through the Civil War. It is held in the Appalachian Settlement which is located behind the museum.
This month, on Feb. 21, Robert K. Rambo, a living history presenter, will give a program on Chief Atta Kul Kulla, a leader of the Cherokee Nation who was called “the most important Indian of his day.” The program is free, and more information can be found on the FHC website, http://www.reinhardt.edu/funkheritage. On March 21, the FHC is presenting a “Exploring the Past through Photographs.” Various presenters will offer suggestions on what you can learn about your ancestors from old photographs. It is also free to Reinhardt students with their ID.

So I tell you, go check out the Funk Heritage Center. It is an interesting museum with lots of resources and ways to get involved and learn more about our heritage as residents of Cherokee County and Reinhardt College. And did I mention it’s free?

Erin Turner, Business Manager 

Thanks to Dr. Joseph Kitchens and Ms. Martha Hout for their contributions to this article.

New Director of Career Services

Career Fair

Ms. Peggy Collins has recently joined the Reinhardt staff as Director of Career Services. Ever wonder how to write a resume or how to look for a job? Do you have no idea what you want to do after college? Ms. Collins will be able to help you with all that, and can also assist in finding internships and other valuable resources to help you during and after college. You can find Ms. Collins in her office in the Hasty Student Center # 301, or call (campus extension 5548) or email (prc@reinhardt.edu).

Erin Turner

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