Hotel/motel taxation update

By Meagan Hurley, Editor-In-Chief

At the council meeting on Monday, Sept. 22, Waleska city officials spoke in reference to their attempted imposition of a hotel/motel taxation ordinance on resident students at Reinhardt. In a statement issued by Mayor Doris Jones, the council explained that the city is waiting on a current ruling from the Georgia Attorney General before any further action may be taken.

Mayor Jones stated, “I am coming up to speak to you tonight on the subject of the lodging ordinance and the fees. The option was presented and encouraged by the Department of Community Affairs at the Georgia Municipal Association convention and the city was looking into the possibility. Apparently it’s a gray area of the law. However, the city is not taking any further action on the issue until we receive direction from the Attorney General’s office, which the Georgia Municipal Association is obtaining.”

City Manager Aimee Abernathy later commented that the Attorney General’s office has not provided the city with any timeline for the decision.

Abernathy also stated that, while no college in the state of Georgia has attempted the ordinance, other states have been successful.

SGA President Alexander Bryant was present at the meeting. He issued the following statement:

“I believe the meeting went extremely well. I believe it was very civil and reasonable dialogue and I think both sides are much better informed now. However, my position is still the same. I still oppose [the taxation] on behalf of the students and the university.”

He added, ”I believe it is not a beneficial policy, not so much for its temporary effects on Reinhardt, but for the precedent it makes for the state of Georgia.”

For more information regarding the hotel/motel taxation, visit the Georgia Department of Community Affairs website. City council members encourage questions. Meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Monday of every month at city hall.

Patrols clarified in women’s residence halls

By Ivy Steele, Staff writer

In recent days, there have been growing concerns voiced by freshman girls over the late night visits made by male Public Safety officials thought to be entering female only residence halls.

The residents of the dorms have not been made aware of why Public Safety officials are frequenting their halls, which sparked a subject of concern. When asked about the seemingly random and allegedly infrequent visits to the residence halls like Gordy, Public Safety stated the patrols are part of their dorm search protocols. The Public Safety office does not disclose the specific times or dates that they search the campus for security reasons and because it takes away the element of surprise, which could be potentially helpful for officials if crimes are occurring.

The general routine by Public Safety consists of walkthroughs, lock ups, and random searches. According to Chief Sherry Cornett, the first priority for them are the lock ups. Public Safety goes around to the different buildings at set times, which are coordinated by when the building is in use, and locks all external doors. The next thing that they do is walk through the dorms randomly to ensure that there are no doors propped open, which has been a conflict in the past, or people in locations they are not allowed after visiting hours. An example of this is males in female dorms after midnight or 1:00 a.m.

Walkthroughs in individual halls must involve the Residence Advisor accompanying the member of Public Safety. This is done at the request of Residence Life so that they are accompanied on the nightly shutdown.

The key reason for these patrols, as pointed out by the Chief of Public Safety, is that there are many redundant safety features at Reinhardt. The doors must be repeatedly unlocked, and residents are not supposed to open the doors to anyone not directly coming for them. This is a subject of concern for Public Safety as it is defeating the purpose of the lock system, they said. However, Public Safety says that the mere presence of the Public Safety personnel are a deterrent to crime.

Sherry Cornett, the Chief of Public Safety, said that with her experience at the much larger school of Georgia Tech, she can easily see how it is in [students] best interest to use the safety features available to them. The features she refers to are: the redundant lock system, the rules regarding visitors, and door policies.

Public Safety wants to let the students know that Public Safety personnel aim to be approachable and helpful. Should students have any questions for them, they encourage students to ask, as they claim to enjoy bonding with the students.

Arrest in Gordy hall

By Ivy Steele, Staff writer

Two women in the freshman female Gordy Residence Hall have been investigated for possession of illicit substances.

The testimony of an unnamed witness claimed that it has been determined that the women did, in fact, have marijuana. The unnamed witness was present in the elevator when a Residence Advisor from another hall and herself smelled the obvious and overpowering scent of marijuana. The women were reported to their Residence Advisor, who then alerted Public Safety. The Residence Advisor did not comment on the situation.

Public Safety and the Residence Life judicial branch have made their decision and it has not been proved that anyone has been evicted. Public Safety was able to supply a limited amount of information on the topic, due to legal obligation not to disclose certain information. The information that they did disclose was that there were arrests made on Aug. 21 and 23. The women were removed from the dorm for a period of time while the investigation and ruling were being made. The records for these arrests have not been released yet, but when they are they should be available via the county sheriff’s office.

Despite the fact that there have been arrests on campus, Public Safety would like to assure the students that the arrests on campus have significantly decreased from those of last fall. Public Safety also said that they are aware of the use and possession of illicit substances such as drugs and alcohol on campus, as it would be ignorant to assume there is not. Public Safety stated that, “Ultimately the goal of Public Safety is to provide a safe learning environment for the students.”

Public Safety will not hesitate to take action when needed and act as a liaison to the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department.

Annual yard sale closes for final year

By Ivy Steele, Staff writer

The annual yard sale held in the Falany Performing Art Center has just finished its final sale.

The annual event is organized by Susan Naylor, the advisor for the Naturally Sharp Collegiate Chapter. Naylor puts in countless hours to make the funds required to fund the program. All benefits from the yard sale go towards the Music Teachers National Association, which is taking a trip to the Georgia Music Teachers Association State Conference. The costs of the conference are usually enough to cover the hotel required for the conference. This year the goal of 1,000 dollars was set to cover the hotel, travel, and food for the conference. According to Ms. Naylor, the final year of the yard sale was a success as they met their goal exactly.

There were many items featured in a four room spread. The yard sale sold games, household goods, car accessories, jewelry, clothes, and shoes. This year the sale included some big ticket items such as a Sony Walkman in perfect condition, some artwork, furniture, and an Alpaca set.

The yard sale as a whole usually makes between seven hundred dollars and one thousand dollars. This sale is entirely donation based, which has now become an area of conflict, said Naylor. The Falany center is no longer allowed to store the products that are sold in the yard sale. The donations come in year round, which becomes a problem when Ms. Naylor has nowhere to store such things. This has proved to be a very distressing revelation for Ms. Naylor, as she now must find a new place to store goods, or find a new fundraiser.

The yard sale is where most of the group’s profits come from, but they also hold a Belk Charity Day Sale, which will be November 8th. The group visits nursing homes, conferences, assists with the Samaritan’s purse charity, and this year’s Toy’s for Tots.

The efforts from students in the group was the most important part of the sale according to Ms. Naylor. She would like to thank everyone who donated items, particularly Kip McVay of Lake Arrowhead, and all who came by and bought something and gave cash donations, but especially, “The students who went above and beyond in helping with the yard sale : Holly Nash, Trent Futch, Stephanie Kinney, and LeeAnn Moore.” Overall Ms. Naylor believes that they had a blessed effort and is very appreciative to everyone who helped make it possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First year seminar: helpful or not?

Photo by Marvin Monroe
Photo by Marvin Monroe

Photo by Marvin Monroe

By Marvin Monroe, Staff writer

The First Year Seminar (FYS) class is something many freshmen gossip about over lunch during the first few weeks of each semester – mostly negatively. Many freshmen have said that they see their FYS class as a “waste of time” or “just another grade to worry about”. They have even gone so far as to say that the class is a hindrance to their college experience – something that takes up unnecessary time and bears little to no result. One professor who teaches an FYS course on contemporary perspectives on environmentalism, Laurence Stacey, took the time last week to explain why he believes that FYS is a course that is incredibly helpful in aiding students as they begin their collegiate education.

“In the First Year Seminar (course), you are helping students who are entering college think critically,” Stacey said. According to Stacey, teaching students to think critically is a big part of the FYS curriculum no matter which professor is teaching it.

“Students are coming from an academic environment where they are told what to think. You prepare for standardized tests. You prepare for regimented tests. The First Year Seminar when it is functioning at its best, in my opinion, helps students deconstruct arguments and to examine their beliefs, and also to discuss arguments with other students to really learn the fine art of thinking,” Professor Stacey said as a way of explaining the need for students to learn to think critically before jumping into the college curriculum.

According to many professors, the fine art of thinking is something very foreign to people who have just left high school and have now started college. This is dangerous in a college classroom because students who cannot think critically can be left out of a class conversation or even be left behind in the class altogether.

Later on in the interview, Stacey says that he loves teaching this class because “it is one of the few classes that let a professor choose a topic he loves or is interested in and really develop that topic in the landscape of critical thinking.”

When asked why he thought that freshmen students might dislike their FYS classes, Stacey said, “I think that you hear that from many students because of their own experience in their First Year Seminar classes. The First Year Seminar is a great class when it works well and when you have an instructor who is engaged with students in critical dialogue and who uses different rhetorical strategies – a professor who brings up arguments that students would not have considered. When you don’t have that experience, that is when you have students who see this more as a fluff class that does not help them very much academically.”

City of Waleska plans to attempt hotel/motel tax ordinance on resident students

By Meagan Hurley and Kelcey Caulder

Members of the City of Waleska met with President Dr. Thomas Isherwood last Friday to discuss the city’s planned imposition of a hotel/motel tax ordinance, a consumer lodging taxation, on Reinhardt resident students. If passed, the ordinance would require approximately 615 resident students to pay a set taxation fee, ranging from three to eight percent, each semester in order to reside at the Waleska campus.

If passed, the ordinance would be the first instance of hotel/motel taxation to occur on a residential campus in Georgia. It would go into effect on July 1, 2015.

According to city officials, the proceeds of this taxation would go toward placing and maintaining streetlights, sidewalks and new signage around Waleska, as a portion of the hotel/motel tax must directly benefit community tourism.

In breaking down how the taxation would work, Aimee Abernathy, City Manager, said, “You pay a set number for food, room, board, and all of it. It’s part of that package. So what you would do, [they] would take out anything for food, the only thing that would be looked at is the count for heads in beds. The actual amount of bodies that sleep in just the facility. You would divide that amount into the number of days of the semester, multiply that times thirty, and then that’s by the percentages.

So, if part of the package is $500 dollars for thirty days, it would be $15 a semester for this tax. That tax would go into sidewalks, streetlights, and other improvements.”

In short, the rate will be concluded by dividing the number of residents by the number of days in a semester, and then multiplying that number times thirty.

Doris Jones, Mayor of Waleska, views the taxation as a way for students to be involved in the improvement of the Waleska community.

“We want to change the face of Waleska…By doing the small amount that you would be doing, in some ways you would gain ownership, you would have a piece of Waleska… You could walk around and say, ‘I helped do that,’” Mayor Jones said last Friday.

She continued, ”We are looking to bring about a better looking Waleska. Reinhardt is already beautiful. We have not had the funds to do it with… This is a way that it’s not going to hurt the students.”

Abernathy added, “[Dr. Isherwood] explained to us the concerns of the students and of the independent schools because this has not been imposed in Georgia. It is legal, but people have not taken advantage of this opportunity. We are so small that we need this opportunity. “

University President Isherwood takes a different stance on the hotel/motel ordinance, stating that he feels Reinhardt students are, and should be considered, citizens of Waleska. Citizens of a jurisdiction are not subject to hotel/motel ordinances.

“I expressed to the mayor that I felt the students living in residence halls were citizens of Waleska and that our students should be able to register to vote in the city of Waleska,” he said.

”I spoke to the mayor and city manager Friday. My understanding is that they are being advised by the Department of Community Affairs that they can apply a hotel/ motel tax to our residential students. We have been in contact with our attorney and he interprets the law differently and doesn’t feel that that’s possible.

Basically, I informed the mayor that this will be an issue for our students and their parents. We will encourage our students to express themselves and to be involved, to be respectful, but at the same time to be free to take whatever political action they feel appropriate…If it does become law, obviously Reinhardt obeys the law.”

Student Government Association President, Alexander Bryant, issued the following statement on behalf of himself and the SGA Executive Board:

“Student Government Association does not support or condone the taxation policy proposed by the City of Waleska. Reinhardt University and its residential students do not want or need this financial burden imposed by the City. We believe it sets a dangerous precedent for taxation of residential students not only in the community of North Georgia, but nationwide.

We are not opposed to the City of Waleska’s growth, in fact, we support it. However, we believe that there is a way to achieve that growth which is mutually beneficial to both parties, and does not involve putting a further financial strain on low-income college students. Student Government Association will work to mobilize the students of Reinhardt to fight this policy in any way possible.”

The proposed hotel/motel taxation will be discussed in further depth at the City Council meeting on Sept. 22. Meetings occur every first and third Monday of the month at 7 p.m. Council members encourage attendance.

For more details regarding the hotel/motel taxation ordinance, visit:

http://www.dca.state.ga.us/development/research/programs/hotelmoteltax.asp

City of Waleska attempts hotel/motel tax ordinance

According to Alexander Bryant, Reinhardt SGA President, Mayor of Waleska Doris Jones will meet with University President Dr. Thomas Isherwood tomorrow, Sept. 12 to discuss details of the city’s planned imposition of a hotel/motel taxation ordinance on the city of Waleska and Reinhardt students. Resident students would be affected by this taxation, if the ordinance is passed.

More details to come as information is given.

To learn more about the hotel/motel tax ordinance, visit: http://www.dca.state.ga.us/development/research/programs/ordinance.asp

 

Meagan Hurley and Kelcey Caulder 

New Scholarship Endowment Established at Reinhardt University

Students at Reinhardt University often discuss the difficulty of finding scholarships to help cover the cost of steadily increasing private school education. New donations from the trust of Mr. James M. Boring Jr. and Syble E. Boring, long-time supporters of the college, will help ease the financial burden placed on students.

The contribution of more than $200,000 has allowed the university to establish the James M. Boring, Jr. and Syble E. Boring Scholarship Endowment, which will provide scholarship assistance to Reinhardt students, based on demonstrated financial need and academic success. Priority for these scholarships will be given to students in or from Whitfield County, where Mr. Boring was president of Dalton Rock Products and Dalton Asphalt for 30 years prior to his retirement.

“It was my privilege to know and visit Mr. and Mrs. Boring on many occasions, and I have fond memories of both,” said JoEllen Wilson, Reinhardt University’s Vice President for Advancement. “They appreciated what Reinhardt means to our students and alumni, as evidenced by the gift for scholarships.”

This was not the first that the Boring family was actively involved in helping to develop Reinhardt’s campus and in bettering the environment for students. Mr. Boring was an active member of Reinhardt’s Board of Trustees from 1989 to 2001, and an emeritus member from 2001 until his passing in 2008. The university’s Jim and Syble Boring Sports Complex, which include the Ken White Baseball and Softball fields, as well as the Ken White Soccer and Lacrosse Fields, was named for the couple.

 

Kelcey Caulder, Managing Editor

The Student Athlete, and Scholar?

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It is an age-old stereotype that student athletes, especially those at the collegiate level, put very little emphasis on academics. The struggle to perform to perfection and maintain outstanding grades is real, there’s no doubt about that. Between the large quantities of time athletes must dedicate to practice and classes themselves, sports stars often have very little time to study at the level that is needed in order to be successful, and thus grades begin to drop. However, there are a few exceptions to this ideal. While there are many student athletes out there who struggle with their academics, there are also athletes that excel academically. What makes them different, and how do they do this?

1379490_723302247683251_682725231_nReinhardt University freshman baseball player Blake Oviedo takes fifteen credit hours per semester—a full class load—and dedicates on average 3-4 hours a day to baseball, yet he still maintains mostly As. As a Pre-Med/Biology major, Oviedo works hard to balance his schoolwork with his sport. When asked if this was a difficult task, he responded, “It was at first, but not anymore. Once I got acclimated to my schedule, I just decided to stick with everything and put forth a lot of effort. It’s worked out so far.”

How coaches encourage athletes to perform academically is also a prominent subject in sports media. Now more than ever, coaches are urging players to remember that athletes are students first. Oviedo commented, “Coach Howard has been really tough on us academically, even having us fill out grade sheets. Even though they can be a bit of a hassle, I think that they motivate us to do well, which is the ultimate goal.”

alyssaAlyssa Kroll, sophomore biology major at RU, is a tennis player who also excels academically, even partaking in the Honors program. Kroll states that maintaining good grades during sports season is often a challenge for athletes. “It’s definitely hard sometimes [to maintain high grades], especially during the on season, but it’s doable. It just takes a lot of dedication.” Kroll also stated that playing tennis while working towards a degree has strengthened her personal skills. “I’ve learned a lot about time management and communication,” she said.

Reinhardt cheerleader Brittany Winston is also an exemplary student. The sophomore Global Communications major works hard to balance her time between classes and practices. Winston takes a different stance on the degree of difficulty time management takes of her. “[Time management] has never really been that hard to me. I’ve never let things stress me out, so I just get stuff done,” she said. Like Oviedo’s coach, Winston explains that Coach Fulghom places heavy emphasis on academics. “She’s even given us a couple of practices off to dedicate to studying for finals,” Winston said.

1010640_10151690738970730_536940108_nWhile there are many athletes that do struggle to maintain necessary grade point averages, spectators and fans must also keep in mind that there are an influx of student athletes that parallel as scholars. It is evident that rising to the standards of a student athlete is difficult, but it is also clear that athletes are capable of outstanding academic achievements when adequate effort is applied.

Meagan Hurley, Editor-In-Chief 

Monster Mash

To help the Reinhardt students celebrate Halloween, the Student Activities Council held the annual Monster Mash in the Glasshouse. On Halloween night, from 9PM to 12AM, Reinhardt students dressed up in costumes and headed to the Monster Mash to listen to music, dance, receive free t-shirts, eat candy, and compete in costume contests.

 

The three different costume contests that students could compete in were the scariest costume contest, the cutest couple costume contest, and the funniest costume contest. The winner of the scariest costume was a student who had dressed up in all leather clothing and a dead skeleton mask. The couple who had won the cutest couple costume contest were dressed as Princess Leia and Han Solo from the movie series Star Wars. The winners of the funniest costume were dressed up as Miley Cyrus and her wrecking ball from one of Miley’s most recent music videos. All of the winners of the contests received gift cards as their prize for their impressive costumes.

 

To prepare for the event, the Student Activities Council advertised thoroughly throughout the campus with flyers and even a skeleton and mummy couple, who were dressed as if they were going to a prom, in the dining hall. They also spent a good bit of time on Thursday afternoon decorating the Glasshouse with all the spooky decorations that they could acquire until the room was to their pleasing.

 

When the time came for the dance to begin, the costumed students filed into to the Glasshouse and began what turned out to be a long night of fun. Although it may have ended a little bit earlier than the Student Activities Council had predicted, everyone that attended the event reported to have had an excellent time dancing and hanging out with their friends.

 

Ashlee Davenport

Reinhardt STOPS HUNGER NOW

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shnOn October 15, Jordan Thrasher, the school chaplain, hosted a packaging event for Stop Hunger Now in the Glasshouse. From eleven AM to one o’clock PM, over one hundred student volunteers worked together to package meals for hungry families. In just two hours, the volunteers were able to package over eighteen thousand meals, which can now be shipped to other countries in need. The minimum requirement for an event by Stop Hunger Now is ten thousand. Reinhardt’s eighteen thousand meals was added to the Stop Hunger Now’s website counter with 521,616 other meals for this week alone. Reverend Thrasher announced a “huge THANK YOU” to the volunteers who helped make the event successful. He also reminds students that more awareness events will be coming up in November during National Hunger Week.

Stop Hunger Now is an organization started in 1998 that helps provide food and disaster relief in countries with those in need. Their goal is to end hunger “in our lifetime” and in efforts to raise awareness and gain volunteers, they have offered a travelling meal-packing program since 2005. The program travels to various locations, including school and churches, so volunteers can pack meals of rice, soy, and vegetables, for the organization to send oversees to countries with people in need. Stop Hunger Now is currently helping children and families who are hungry in sixty-five different countries. Volunteer work and meal-packing programs are popular not only in the United States, but internationally as well.
Mollie Street, Staff Writer

Fly on the Wall: An Explanation

The Hiltonian has been made aware that this past week’s Fly on the Wall has created a sense of uneasiness on campus. We apologize for causing this upset, and would like to take a moment to fully explain our intentions in correlation to the Fly on the Wall column.

The Hiltonian has served as Reinhardt’s news source since 1924 and the anonymously written Fly on the Wall column has been a part of the newspaper for the past several years. Fly on the Wall is an Opinions / Arts & Entertainment piece that is made to entertain by being humorous and satirical in nature. It is strictly the opinion of the writer, and does not in any way reflect the views of The Hiltonian staff.

Any student at any time can submit content for the Fly on the Wall column. The column is written anonymously and a different student writes an article on a different subject each edition. Editors then pick from submissions as to which article will be published, based on the criteria of entertainment potential and the ability to relate to students.

The Hiltonian staff apologizes for any lack of clarity regarding Fly on the Wall. It is NOT a factual news article, but merely an opinion of a student. Anyone with any further questions, comments, or concerns is welcomed to submit a Letter to the Editor. (See link at the top of page.)

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

The Hiltonian Staff

Reinhardt Defeats Bethel, Continuing Winning Streak

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Untitled_Page_33Reinhardt extended its win streak to three games with their stopping a comeback from the Bethel Wildcats in the final quarter of the game. Coming off a defensive showcase against Kentucky Christian and an exhilarating upset versus (23) Faulkner University, the Eagles looked to prove themselves as a threat in the Mid-South Conference Western Division. Their noon game began with a Reinhardt drive that resulted in an interception returned for 63 yards, which set up Bethel’s first score to put the Eagles down 0-7.

The Eagles offense responded with an eight play drive, 75-yard drive that completed with RB Carl Edouard leaping over goal line defenders for an Eagles touchdown. Bethel responded with their own 65 yard drive, finished by their QB scoring on an 8 yard zone read play.

On the ensuing kickoff, after KR Travis Nunley bobbled the catch, he returned the kickoff for 100 yards to tie the game 14-14. The Reinhardt defense held strong against a seasoned Bethel’s offense and forced the Wildcats to settle for a 41-yard field goal. With only ten minutes left in the first half, the Eagles ignited for three scores with the first coming from Carl Edouard from one yard out after a 53 yard drive that showcased the throwing ability of Chamblee who finished 12-of-14 for 160 yards and a touchdown.

The ensuing Wildcats drive ended in a fumble caused by LB Jared Johnson and after a 7 play 70-yard drive, the Eagles scored again with Stegall recording his first touchdown of the day from 15 yards out. Another defensive stop set up Reinhardt’s final drive of the half. Yet another exhibition of Reinhardt’s receiving core, the drive ended with four seconds on the clock when Chamblee floated a ball to WR Tyler Bradley in the corner of the end zone for a jump-ball catch over the Wildcats defender. This put the Eagles ahead, 34-17.

The second half began with the injury of Eagle’s QB Chamblee. And it was until the end of the 3rd quarter that either team scored, with Wildcats recording a touchdown with 2:05 on the clock. The comeback continued when the Eagles threw an interception, on what looked like a miscommunication between the receiver and the quarterback on a hot route, which resulted in a pick six.

Eagles 34-31.

With the Wildcats on their heels, Reinhardt needed a score and trusting in the arm of QB Ryan Thompson. They succeeded and finished the drive with an 8-yard rushing touchdown with 1:18 left in regulation.

Eagles 41-31.

Fans were already leaving the stadium when the Wildcats pieced together a 30 second drive for a touchdown against the Eagles. Down by 5, Bethel attempted an onside kick, but failed to recover it and the Eagles ran the clock out for their third consecutive win.

Next week Reinhardt faces the Union College Bulldogs on the road. The Bulldogs are 1-3 coming off a 24-17 win against UVA-Wise. The game can be heard on Stretch Internet at reinhardteagles.com.

Leon Sapp, Sports Writer

Talent Show to Be Held October 18th

Every year, the Student Activities Council sponsors Reinhardt’s annual talent show. This year, the talent show will take place on Friday, October 18th.

To participate in this show, students must first audition for members of the Student Activities Council. Auditions took place in the glasshouse on Tuesday, September 26th this year and there was quite a turnout of those who wished to audition. Each act signed up with a member from the Student Activities Council and then waited to perform for a panel of judges. The judges then decided whether or not they would be going on to perform for the actual talent show.

The talent this year includes many musical performers, dancers, and many others that are excited to show off their unique skills. In the past, there have been many varied performances including musical numbers, flag routines, clogging, break dances, and many other impressive talents. Kody Spaniak, a senior and member of last year’s winning act said that, “The Reinhardt Talent Show is always an exciting and thrilling showcase of our students’ abilities. Be prepared for a night of stunning entertainment.”

The talent show is an event that all students look forward to, and there’s definitely a reason for that. The show is free to attend for students and will be held in the Performing Arts Center on Friday of Homecoming at 7 pm.

Ashlee Davenport, Staff Writer

Philanthropy Hosts RAINN Day

Photo courtesy of Google Images.
Photo courtesy of Google Images.

Photo courtesy of Google Images.

RAINN, the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network, is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. The goal of the organization is to prevent sexual violence, help victims, and ensure that rapists are brought to justice. On September 26th Reinhardt participated in RAINN Day by holding a Take Back the Night Walk to raise awareness for sexual assault and prevention.

Every two minutes, someone in the United States is sexually assaulted. That totals about 207, 754 victims every year. 44% of these victims are under the age of 18. Out of these assaults, 54% will not be reported to the police. 97% of rapists will not spend any time in jail. RAINN’s mission is to reduce these assault statistics by educating people about assault and prevention, and to ensure that rapists are brought to justice. RAINN Day is designed to bring public attention to these statistics, and Reinhardt’s Take Back the Night Walk helped students learn more about sexual assault.

About twenty students participated in the walk, which led from the Glasshouse to the gym. Student Vanessa Irie attended the walk and commented. “At first, I didn’t really understand or see the importance of the walk. But as we made our way to gym, holding our candles in silence, I had time to reflect. So many people are victims, and so many of them stay silent. The sad thing is that their silence doesn’t mean that the pain goes away. It stays with them, and they just suffer alone.” Students attending the walk had the opportunity to learn about the consequences of sexual abuse, both for the victim and the assailant.

RAINN partners with organizations like ABC, Target, Lifetime Networks, and General Mills to spread their message. Their goal is to educate everyone throughout America about rape, abuse, and incest, as well as the consequences of sexual assault. Besides corporate partnerships, RAINN accepts donations. $0.88 of every dollar goes directly to helping victims and working towards preventing sexual violence. Monthly donations go towards education on college campuses, operating the National Sexual Assault hotlines, and providing information on sexual violence to policymakers. Marie Claire magazine called RAINN “One of 10 Best Charities in the U.S” and the Independent Charities of America commended RAINN as the Best Charity in America.  People who donate to RAINN can be assured that their money is going to a great organization.

Students wanting to learn more about sexual assault and the RAINN organization can visit their website at rainn.org.

 

Candice Bailey, News Editor 

Eagles Take Home Second Consecutive Win, Beating Faulkner

Photo by reinhardteagles.com.
Photo by reinhardteagles.com.

Photo by reinhardteagles.com.

After narrowly losing the first two football games of the Reinhardt Eagles inaugural season, the Eagles seem to be making a comeback, as they’ve won the last two games they’ve played– instating their first ever “winning streak.” The Eagles took home the W over Faulkner University, Number 23, in Montgomery, AL with a final score of 28-24.

Tevin McCoy also earned the title of Defensive Player of the Week for the Mid South Conference division.

Highlights from the game are supplied by reinhardteagles.com and  include:

L.J. Stegall scored three touchdowns as the Reinhardt University football team upset No. 23 Faulkner, 28-24, Saturday night at John Mark Stallings Field in Mid-South Conference West Division action.

Stegall scored his first touchdown when he ran a Faulkner kickoff back 95 yards in the first quarter to tie the score at 7-all. After a pair of Faulkner touchdowns, Stegall took a shovel pass from Ryan Thompson and went 61 yards to paydirt to pull the visitors back within seven. His final touchdown was the final score of the game as he scored on a five-yard touchdown pass from Thompson to push RU ahead for good, 28-24.

“Defensively, we played our best game,” said RU head coach Dr. Danny Cronic. “Offensively, we were able to do enough against a great defense to pull this one out.”

Tevin McCoy had nine tackles and a pair of sacks to anchor a Reinhardt (2-2, 1-0 MSC West) defense that was averaging over 52 points per game to less than half that total. Reining Mid-South Conference Defense Player of the Week Blake Barnes had seven tackles and a sack. “Tevin is a good ball player that has a lot of savvy. Blake Barnes has a lot of savvy too for that matter,” coach Cronic said. “We needed big games from everyone on defense and those two really stepped up for us.”

The fourth quarter would belong to the visitors as Niagel Curtis took the opening snap of the fourth quarter 55 yards to pay dirt to bring RU within three, 24-21. Faulkner would only get three first downs in the quarter and twice turned the ball over on downs after Stegall’s second touchdown reception of the game.

The Eagles were aided by a pair of costly turnovers by Faulkner (3-1, 0-1 MSC West), as Alvarez Thomas made an interception in the endzone in the second quarter to keep Faulkner off the board and Juice Arnold picked off a Josh Hollingsworth pass to set up an RU field goal attempt.”

The Eagles play Bethel College this coming Saturday, September 28th at 12:00 at Ken White field. You won’t want to miss it.

For more information regarding last week’s game, visit http://www.reinhardteagles.com.

Eagles Nest Grand Opening

As most students are aware, a brand new restaurant called “Eagle’s Nest” has very recently opened right off campus in the building that previously housed “The Front Porch.” As with all new restaurants, they celebrated their new beginning with a Grand Opening, which took place on Wednesday night, and left all that attended impressed and wanting more. They opened their doors at 5 pm, and served free pizza and wings to anyone that wanted them until 10 pm.

 

A student that attended the Grand Opening that night, freshman Aili Pitchford was quoted saying: “It seems like a really cool place to go hang out. The food was good and I’m looking forward to going back with friends!” Pitchford was not the only student that seemed to enjoy the new restaurant. Many positive opinions could be heard throughout the restaurant during the course of the night. Those that attended had a great time. Many students showed excitement about returning later in the semester and the year.

For those that missed the opening night and free pizza, there are plenty of chances to return throughout the rest of the school year! Eagle’s Nest is open every Monday through Thursday from 11 am to 10 pm, Friday and Saturday from 11 am to 11 pm, and Sundays from 11 am to 7 pm. They serve pizza, wings, and many other Italian-inspired foods that any college student is sure to crave. Also available, to those that prove they are of drinking age, is a bar with bartenders ready to serve the alcohol beverage of choice.

 

In comparison to “The Front Porch”, which was previously located in the same venue, “Eagle’s Nest” has much more of a college-friendly environment. With multiple college flags hanging outside, jerseys on the walls inside, televisions, and many areas that can be used to simply hang out, college students will be able to find comfort in this environment as they eat and socialize with friends. Not only is the environment a pleasant thing to experience, but the staff are very helpful and efficient as well, making each person’s visit as enjoyable as possible. “Eagle’s Nest” already looks like a great place to hang out with old friends, make new friends, or simply just enjoy some delicious pizza.

Ashlee Davenport, Staff Writer 

SAC Hosts First Lip Sync/Poetry Slam

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Lip-Sync-636x155Last Tuesday night, September 17, SAC held Reinhardt’s first Lip Sync Karaoke/Poetry Slam competition. The glasshouse was packed with lighthearted students and faculty wanting to have fun and dance. Complimentary snacks and drinks were provided, and the cool and comfy atmosphere was the perfect setup for the guest performer of the night.

 

Modern spoken word artist, Brandon Real T@lkWilliams, on twitter @REALTALKRAPS, performed several poems, which “connected” the student body. Students snapped along to his poetry – moving and hilarious works that speak to college students and teenagers alike.

 

“Redneck Woman” and Real T@lkin particular had the audience literally screaming “give me some more!”. This mantra was repeated before every new performer. Several bold students took the stage to lip sync and get their groove on to crowd-pleasing songs by beloved artists such as the Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys. The Wobble and the Cupid Shuffle brought half of the audience on stage to dance and have fun while Letia Wyatt and Shelby Noblitt ran the show. Alma Rangel, a member of SAC, was overjoyed at the success of the event, saying “Everyone did a good job, especially the performers. We had a great crowd and a lot of fun”. The energy from the crowd led performers to do some outstanding head-banging and students shouted out encouragement as they left their homework worries behind for a couple of hours.

 

While SAC does not have another Lip Sync night planned, they did announce their plan to play “The Conjuring” in October, along with several other fun events that students are invited to attend.

 

Students are encouraged to see any member of SAC to suggest ideas for events they would like to see at the school or to learn more about how they can get involved in events on campus. The RAINN Day: Take Back the Night Walk is the next event on SAC’s calendar. It is to be held on Thursday, September 26, from 7-9pm.

 

Mollie Street, Staff Writer

Reinhardt Hosts 2013 Student Leadership Conference

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Reinhardt University’s 2013 Student Leadership Conference proved to be a huge success. The Glasshouse was full of student leaders eager to learn ways to impact the Reinhardt community. Keynote speaker, Latrell Armstrong, talked to the students about what being a leader in the community means. His message and program, “Making the Dean’s List”, is a true story about a homeless man whose life was changed by one word – potential. Mr. Armstrong empowered students to pursue their full potential and take initiative, to truly become leaders in their community.

 

Students participated in two quality building games that taught them how to think when dealing with situations in which reaching their full potential could be difficult. The first was an economic, buy-sell stock game where students were paired up and placed in a group with three other sets of partners. They all had one goal: make the most money for their major corporation. Student battled each other every round, some making as much as $37,000 and others losing as much as $26,000. In the end, Mr. Armstrong re-stated the rules to the game – “You are all branches of the same corporation.” His words left the students wondering why they fought so hard when they all had the same goal, and were working for the same pretend company.

 

The second game Mr. Armstrong presented the students with had an even deeper message. Students had to follow set rules and build their ideal community within a time limit. Frustration and utter confusion ensued. Some students were “arrested” by Mr. Armstrong, who had named himself the Sheriff, and many more were prohibited from making their community as grand as they had wanted it to be. When all was said and done, Mr. Armstrong drove his final point home. With each group committed solely to their small communities, everyone forgot that they were part of an entire city. Instead of branching out of their comfort zones and trying to work with other teams, the students grew irritated with one another and the individual communities quickly became various districts of what a city map looks like.

 

Instead of working together as a student body, we often become so caught up in prejudices and social classes that we forget we have a common goal to make our school the best that it can be. Mr. Armstrong’s message will be taken to heart by many students, mostly freshman meeting FYS requirements, who stayed, listened and questioned whether or not they were meeting their potential. Now, we ask – Is Reinhardt meeting its potential? And how do we work together, without walls or prejudice, to meet that potential?

 

Mollie Street, Staff Writer

Year of Germany

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Year of Germany will feature events such as Oktoberfest, a hotdog eating contest, a Holocaust memorial, and the first annual Reinhardt Cup. Professor Dana Hall, Year of Germany Co-Chair, assigned her Principles of Marketing class, BUS 302, to initiate the set up of the year’s activities. She feels that having students run the Year of Germany activities will get more students involved.

Hall is very excited about this year’s prospects and the chance for students to explore German history and culture. “Our founder Captain Reinhardt was of German descent and this was the impetus for selecting Germany as the focus for 2013-2014,” Hall stated. “Germany is known as a land of poets, musicians and thinkers who have made significant contributions, from Bach and Beethoven to Martin Luther, who launched the Protestant Reformation.  There is so much to learn about this fascinating country, and it will be impossible to cover everything in a year.  This year, we’re actively involving students in the planning and execution of events and activities, and these students have introduced fresh thinking and great new ideas.”

One fresh and new idea from students included the idea for a non-alcoholic Oktoberfest. Reinhardt’s Oktoberfest will be held on October 17th. Students will be able to learn about the history and culture of Oktoberfest while enjoying root beer and drinking games. The Oktoberfest committee is still in the planning process. Most likely food and drink will be provided through Sodexo, but the group is attempting to incorporate an authentic German deli from Ball Ground, Georgia.

The main goal of the Year of Germany is to educate students about the history of Germany as well as students’ own history. Reinhardt’s library has free access to ancestry.com for students and faculty. Students are encouraged to research their family tree and discover their heritage. The hotdog eating contest during Oktoberfest will require entrants to fill out a family tree to enter. Students can visit the library to fill out a family tree and enter the hotdog eating contest. While students do not have to participate in the hotdog eating contest once a family tree has been filled out, students wanting to enter the contest must fill out a family tree dating back three or four generations.

The Holocaust Memorial will be held in the Glass House the same week as the infamous Night of Broken Glass, or Kristallnacht. The memorial event will feature a history of the Holocaust and the overall history of Germany.

Year of Germany Co-Chair Melissa Doyle is excited for the upcoming festivities and hopes that both students and faculty will participate. “Our committee this year has members from many schools and departments that have never been represented in the Year Of programs.  We can better explore the diversity of a nation by diversifying the program, and everyone benefits.  My hope is that professors will begin to incorporate the Year Of into their courses, adding lectures or assignments as relevant to their discipline.  The activities are going to be more interactive and have greater appeal for everyone.”

Students can look forward to more information on these events.

Candice Bailey, News Editor

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